News

Febuary 6th, 2017. ConSynance is exploring small leptin mimetics for the treatment Alzheimer's Disease (AD).

In 2008, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared dementia as a priority condition. Prevalence and incidence projections indicate that the number of people with dementia will continue to grow, particularly in the elderly. The total number of people with dementia worldwide in 2010 is estimated at 35.6 million and is projected to nearly double every 20 years, to 65.7 million in 2030. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. There are no available treatments that stop or reverse the progression of the disease, which harrowingly leads to death. This is a field of largely unmet medical need and effective treatments are urgently needed.

Metabolic dysregulation is common in AD and recent evidence highlights impaired leptin receptor function in AD which further suggests that enhancement of leptin signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach. Indeed, leptin has demonstrated cognitive enhancing properties and prevents the aberrant effects of amyloid β (Aβ). It is well accepted that key pathology of AD is the Aβ accumulation that triggers synaptic impairments and neuronal death. As leptin is an endogenous large peptide with a relatively short half-life, the development of smaller leptin-mimetics with longer residence times may be a better therapeutic approach.

A recent publication from Professor Jenni Harvey’s group at the University of St Andrews, UK found that a fragment of leptin (116–130), originally discovered by our collaborator Professor Patricia Grasso for its anti-diabetic properties, showed significant effects in several cellular and animal models of AD (1). In particular, Harvey’s group has examined the cognitive enhancing and neuroprotective properties of leptin (116–130) fragment and found it mirrored the ability of leptin. For example, leptin (116–130) prevented synaptic disruption and neuronal cell death in models of amyloid toxicity and enhanced performance in episodic-like memory tests in rodents.

The more recently discovered smaller leptin mimetics, OB3, [D-Leu4]-OB3 and its myristic acid conjugate and related analogues, also discovered by professor Grasso (2-9), not only have leptin-like activity, but also possess much better pharmaceutical properties than the larger leptin mimetics (116–130). Therefore, we expect that the smaller leptin mimetics, OB3, [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and its myristic acid conjugate and related analogues will show similar effects in the AD models and have the potential as novel therapeutics for the treatment of AD. In addition to our on-going efforts in exploring the utility of these smaller peptides for diabetes, we will embark on investigating them for the treatment of AD.

ConSynance Therapeutics holds the exclusive rights to the intellectual property of the OB3, [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and its myristic acid conjugate series.

For cited references, see:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27600840
2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25453979
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18455249
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19344673
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20026361
6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22960403
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24819473
8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27050378
9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23500518


July 1st, 2016. Our new location!

We have officially moved into our new office located within the Biotech Business Incubator at the East Campus of State University of New York. Our new address is 11 University Place, Rm D210B, Rensselaer, NY 12144.


May 1st, 2016. ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. and pharmacologist Nicholas Barnes, Ph.D. join forces to advance novel 5-HT3 receptor modulators for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. and Nicholas Barnes, Ph.D. have entered into a research agreement to develop a new therapy for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) by pursuing a pharmacological strategy that targets the 5-HT3 receptor by a different mechanism. "I have known and worked with Nick for over 10 years on various projects, including this 5-HT3 project when it was started at Albany Molecular Research," commented Peter Guzzo, Ph.D., Co-founder and VP of R&D at ConSynance; "he has tremendous knowledge of the area and I am very excited to work with him again on this project". IBS is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder for which there is currently no effective treatment widely available. ConSynance has an exclusive license to a series of novel 5-HT3 receptor modulators with desirable pharmaceutical properties that targets the receptor by a different mechanism predicted to deliver clinical efficacy coupled with a more acceptable side-effect profile than current standard of care. The goal of the collaboration is to further develop a 5-HT3 receptor modulator as a best-in-class treatment for IBS and attract a pharma partner to help progress to market. Dr. Barnes has extensive expertise with the pharmacology of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), particularly with the 5-HT3 receptor, and is the Chairman of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) Nomenclature Committee for Serotonin Receptors. He is the principal founder and CEO of Celentyx Ltd, a venture capital financed pharmaceutical R&D company focusing on diseases of the immune system, and has a proven track record in the investigation of drug targets and the delivery of development compounds. He is also a Fellow of the British Pharmacological Society and an Honorary Professor at a number of major universities around the globe as well as being Editor-in-Chief, Editor and Associate Editor for the international journals Frontiers in Neuropharmacology, Neuropharmacology, and Frontiers in Neuroscience, respectively.

For further information on the 5-HT3 receptor project, see link here


April 11th, 2016. Professor Patricia Grasso presents research showing that novel leptin-derived synthetic peptide mimetics cross the blood brain barrier into an area of the brain known to regulate energy balance

Dr. Patricia Grasso, Professor of Medicine at Albany Medical College, presented her latest research at the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston on April 2. Her presentation, entitled “Immunohistochemical Localization of [D-Leu-4]-OB3, a Synthetic Peptide Leptin Mimetic, in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Mouse Hypothalamus Following Oral Delivery in Dodecyl Maltoside”, gave the first visual evidence of a synthetic peptide leptin mimetic, [D-Leu-4]-OB3, crossing the blood-brain barrier into an area of the hypothalamus known to regulate energy balance. These findings along with previously reported data in several animal models of diabetes and obesity are consistent with a central mechanism of action for [D-Leu-4]-OB3 involving the activation of hypothalamic leptin receptors.

For further information about the poster, see link here

ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. and Albany Medical College have entered into a licensing and research agreement to develop novel leptin peptide mimetics for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity in humans. Leptin is an endogenous peptide-based hormone that plays a central role in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Novel, small peptides developed in Dr. Grasso’s laboratory have shown significant positive effects on energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and insulin sensitivity in animal models of diabetes and obesity when delivered by oral dosing. The goal of the collaboration is to further develop these leptin mimetics and attract a pharma partner for commercialization.

For additional information on the Leptin project, see link here

For further information on Professor Grasso’s research, see link here

About Albany Medical College

Albany Medical College, one of the nation’s oldest medical schools, is part of Albany Medical Center, which also includes the Albany Medical Center Hospital, one of upstate New York’s largest teaching hospitals, and the Albany Medical Center Foundation, Inc., one of the Capital Region’s most active fundraising organizations. The institution has a three-fold mission of patient care, biomedical research and medical education.


April 6th, 2016. Dr. Peter Guzzo co-authored a review on Inhibitors of Glycine Transporter-1

A review entitled “Inhibitors of Glycine Transporter-1: Potential Therapeutics for the Treatment of CNS Disorders” co-authored by Dr. Peter Guzzo, Co-founder and VP of R&D was recently published on Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, Volume 16. This review examines the pharmacological aspects of GlyT-1 inhibition and describes drug discovery and development efforts toward the identification of novel inhibitors. The PubMed link to the article is here.


March 10th, 2016. ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. and Albany Medical College entered into a licensing and research agreement to develop new treatments for diabetes and obesity

ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. and Albany Medical College, have entered into a licensing and research agreement to develop novel leptin peptide mimetics for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity in humans. Leptin is an endogenous peptide-based hormone that plays a central role in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. The novel, small synthetic peptides from the laboratory of Dr. Patricia Grasso, Professor of Medicine, have shown significant positive effects on energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and insulin sensitivity in animal models of diabetes and obesity when delivered orally. Research continues to characterize their therapeutic potential in additional models of diabetes and obesity. The goal of the collaboration is to further develop these leptin mimetics and attract a pharma partner for commercialization.

Link between type-2 diabetes and obesity and the need for new therapy

The World Health Organization has estimated that the number of children and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus will rise to 366 million by 2030, and that by 2035, approximately 300 million persons will be obese. Obesity has been found to contribute to approximately 80% of all cases of type 2 diabetes. Current treatments for this growing epidemic are insufficient. The novel leptin peptide mimetics under development are differentiated from standard of care due to their multiple positive metabolic effects and oral administration.

For further information on the Leptin project, see link here

For further information on Professor Grasso’s research, see link here

About Albany Medical College

Albany Medical College, one of the nation’s oldest medical schools, is part of Albany Medical Center, which also includes the Albany Medical Center Hospital, one of upstate New York’s largest teaching hospitals, and the Albany Medical Center Foundation, Inc., one of the Capital Region’s most active fundraising organizations. The institution has a three-fold mission of patient care, biomedical research and medical education.


Oct 28, 2015 CSTI entered research collaboration with Dr. Kokkotou of Harvard Medical School/BIDMC

ConSynance Therapeutics, Inc. (CSTI) and Efi Kokkotou, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Principal Investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, have entered into a research collaboration to study the effects of CSTI-100 (ALB-127158) in various models of inflammatory bowel disease. CSTI-100 is an orally acting melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonist that has demonstrated good safety, tolerability and low central nervous system exposure in phase I studies. Research from Dr. Kokkotou’s lab has established the role of MCHR1 in chronic intestinal inflammation. The collaborative research will reveal the potential of CSTI-100 as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease through a novel mechanism of action. It will also take advantage of a human sample-based drug screening platform recently developed in Dr. Kokkotou’s lab to identify patients with inflammatory bowel disease more likely to benefit from the new treatment.

For further information on CSTI-100, see link here